To kickstart our podcast episodes, Steli and Hiten pull from an ongoing Google Sheet full of founder relevant topic ideas that are constantly added to by everyone on the team. They’ll hash out a quick outline for the direction we want the episode to go in, jot down a couple of case study examples to pull from, and start recording a back & forth conversation.


Deciding which customers receive which emails is a way to give marketing messages relevance. Larger companies will use email to push multiple different products, updates and offers. Matching the message to the customer leads to higher sales and greater levels of customer satisfaction. Email marketing software makes it easy for companies to segment their email delivery based on criteria that they establish.
Increase engagement by bridging the divide between your different channels. By providing in-email functionality that connects to your website or app, subscribers have the freedom to interact with you on their preferred device. For example, LinkedIn sends a CTA email when you receive a new LinkedIn invitation that is personalized and prompts the user to confirm the invitation.
Sales Development reps (SDRs), also often called Inside Sales or Lead Qualification reps, are focused on one thing: reviewing, contacting, and qualifying marketing-generated leads and delivering them to Sales Account Executives. Simply put, SDR teams pass the baton from Marketing to Sales. Why do it this way? Because you want to make sure every single lead Marketing passes to your Sales team is as qualified as possible. Your SDRs should take the time to help each and every lead, offer them value, make a positive impression, create future demand, and become a trusted advisor. This step is critical in the lead generation process because you don’t want to treat your leads as blank faces to be simply questioned, qualified, and harvested.
When it comes to marketing your business, it’s important to be where your consumers are.  Email use is thriving and is used by 95% of online consumers.  91% of consumers reported checking their email at least once a day (Exact Target).  In fact, it’s not uncommon for consumers to check their email dozens of times each day.  Using email marketing to promote content and your products and services is a great way to drive more traffic to your website and is a highly effective tool for nurturing leads through the buying cycle.
Email marketing is relatively inexpensive when compared to other traditional marketing tactics such as direct mail and print media. While these traditional print marketing tactics require you to spend money on printing and advertising space, email marketing requires only a small investment of time and resources in developing effective content. In addition to relatively low operational costs, email marketing also provides an attractive return on investment (ROI). According to one report from DBS Data, businesses can expect an average return of $38 for every $1 they spend on email marketing.

According to a study done by Lithium Technologies, 65% percent of users who ask a brand a question on Twitter expect a response within 2 hours, with that percentage rising to 72% if it was a complaint. By proactively listening for those mentioning your brand on social media, you can insert yourself into conversations in real time and capitalize on a countless lead generation opportunities that you’d be missing otherwise.


We recently explored how to vet various email platforms and reviewed key tips to remember when selecting your email marketing management system. Having the right email marketing platform is a solid foundation but crafting an email that can cut through the digital clutter and reach your audience depends on more than just your platform. Carefully choosing the goals and structure of your email campaign while considering important formatting trends are key factors in creating successful email campaigns. In part two of our series, we will explore six different types of email marketing campaigns.  Join us in two weeks for our final installment when we review a series of important formatting factors to keep in mind when launching your email initiatives.
When the United States Postal Service created a nationwide postal network in the 1840s, mail became an important tool for marketing. Connecting with people through their mailboxes allowed businesses to offer customized marketing messages to specific segments of the customer base. It is likely that much of the mail you now receive contains some kind of marketing message. Catalogs, brochures, coupons and political appeals all pour through the postal service on a daily basis. (See also Direct Mail Marketing)

Sometimes the best business lead generation ideas and well established, but simply done well. I created a targeted list of potential prospects in my niche. I reach out to them personally via cold email to start a conversation and determine if my design studio may be the right fit for them. It has resulted in new clients as well as helped me build my email list. The key is to research each of your prospects thoroughly and send them a fully personalized email.
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