While Death Wish sends the customer to a third-party survey tool for feedback, many businesses will include the full survey in the email itself, often by using a rating system (e.g., “Rate your experience”). You can also send customers to a survey available on your store. This makes it easy to prompt a satisfied customer to start shopping once their review is complete.

With some means of marketing, you can never be certain whether the money you have invested is paying off. However, with this kind of marketing, you can easily measure how much effect has the campaign had. There are various tools on the Internet that can help you with this. For example, you can measure the click-through rate and also see how your customers arrived to your website. This way, you can easily decide whether email marketing is paying off or not.
To kickstart our podcast episodes, Steli and Hiten pull from an ongoing Google Sheet full of founder relevant topic ideas that are constantly added to by everyone on the team. They’ll hash out a quick outline for the direction we want the episode to go in, jot down a couple of case study examples to pull from, and start recording a back & forth conversation.
One way to accomplish this is to actually mix in content with your promotions. Make your promotional emails focus on the sell or offer, and highlight this focus using your stand-out CTA. Then, maybe beneath the main offer, you can provide additional free content that supplements the offer, using a less eye-grabbing CTA. This gives customers an on-ramp to dip their toes in without pulling the trigger on a purchase, which may give you more opportunity to convert them later on.
Email has been shown to generate a better ROI compared to other marketing channels. A survey by the Direct Marketing Association and Demand Metric of marketers in the United States showed that email achieved a median ROI of 122%, which was more than 4 times higher than other marketing channels, including social media (28%), direct mail (27%), and paid search (25%). And in 2016, email marketing generated $44 ROI for every $1 spent, which was up from $38 in 2015. 
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