After 90 days of inactivity, the outlook is not good. If someone goes three months without purchasing, the odds of them returning to purchase are not great. Though, this is definitely dependent upon your store and industry. Some stores simply have a long sales cycle. Just be aware that you will probably start experiencing diminishing returns at 90 days.
Many email newsletter software vendors offer transactional email support, which gives companies the ability to include promotional messages within the body of transactional emails. There are also software vendors that offer specialized transactional email marketing services, which include providing targeted and personalized transactional email messages and running specific marketing campaigns (such as customer referral programs).
So, you’ve already taken that first critical step toward getting your email marketing program off the ground by building your contact list, and now you need to send your subscribers…something. But what should that something be? If you’re struggling to figure out what to send or how to keep your customers engaged, rest easy — we’ve highlighted nine emails your business should send on a regular basis, along with a few tips on creating them. We’ll also tell you, on a scale of 1 to 5, the difficulty level for each email. The closer the number is to 5, the more effort it takes.
Reengagement Emails — At FulcrumTech, we recommend running regular reengagement campaigns to help maintain a “clean” email list by identifying and keeping only those subscribers who are truly interested in hearing from your organization. Reengagement emails are sent to inactive subscribers—those who haven’t opened or clicked on an email in 6 months or more. For more information about how to use email to reengage inactive users, check out this previous FulcrumTech feature. These emails not only reduce your level of inactives, but also encourage clients to come back and buy.
Instead, consider aiming for “green light benchmarks,” a concept created by Ramit Sethi. Once you’ve reached a certain threshold, you can give yourself the “green light” to move on to something else for a bit—there are always bigger fish to fry when growing a business. Sanocki recommends the following benchmarks for most of your promotional and lifecycle email campaigns:
These are just a few examples of how a brand can use on-event email campaigns to extend the dialogue with customers and personalize their experience. When using on-event emails, it’s easy to “set and forget” them. But because these emails offer a tremendous amount of opportunity for additional sales, it’s important to review their performance among your customer base on a regular basis. If certain emails aren’t doing well, make sure to revisit them and refine their content.
When it comes to designing an email for a specific offer, the main component to keep in mind is the offer itself. You want the copy to be brief but descriptive enough to convey the offer's value. In addition, make sure your email's call-to-action (CTA) link is large, clear, and uses actionable language. You can also include a large CTA image/button underneath to make the action you want email readers to take crystal clear.
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