Your About Us page. As marketer Bob Frady writes, “Customers don’t sign up for email, they sign up for your brand.” Email is merely a mechanism—your brand and offers are the backbone of your value proposition and a subscriber’s incentive to give you their email. If your About Us page is doing its job selling your company’s vision, it’s a great place to encourage customers to subscribe.


When the United States Postal Service created a nationwide postal network in the 1840s, mail became an important tool for marketing. Connecting with people through their mailboxes allowed businesses to offer customized marketing messages to specific segments of the customer base. It is likely that much of the mail you now receive contains some kind of marketing message. Catalogs, brochures, coupons and political appeals all pour through the postal service on a daily basis. (See also Direct Mail Marketing)
The elements you include in a welcome email will depend on the specifics of what you're offering. But in general, you can use the email to showcase your brand's personality and to highlight the value that recipients can expect to receive. If you're welcoming new users to a product or service, the welcome email is a great place to explain how everything works and what users need to do in order to get started.
Bonus: As one related mini-lead generation tactic to add onto the process of collecting leads from free downloadable materials on your blog—try leveraging exit-intent popups that detect when a visitor is about to navigate away from your opt-in page, and they'll quickly surface the reader a reminder offer to grab your download before leaving. I've tested this and seen a meaningful lift in new subscribers that otherwise would've left the page.
A less obtrusive method, yet similar in idea, is a lead generation form box triggered by a scrolling action. These can be useful, as they slide into view when a user reaches the bottom of a page. If a page visitor reads to the bottom of your webpage page, they have most likely enjoyed your content. Placing a timed call to action on the bottom of the page can capitalize on a visitor’s interest – meaning the visitor will want to sign up for more similar content.
Lusha is a simple app that enables you to reveal mobile numbers, direct phone numbers and contact email addresses when you are browsing prospects in LinkedIn or Twitter. It takes two clicks to launch Lusha in as an app in Google Chrome. If you’re existing customers use Twitter and LinkedIn this is a great way to generate the direct contact data that you need to make effective and more personalized cold calls.

Include your contact information in the newsletter. You always want your contact information in an easy-to-find area on the newsletter. The purpose of your newsletter isn’t necessarily to sell, but if your customers are inspired to reach out to you because of the newsletter, you want them to be able to find you. You could put social media contact buttons in the header or footer of your message; you could go the more traditional route, and include your phone number and email address; or you could do both. In the example below from our very own VerticalResponse newsletter, you’ll notice the social buttons in the top right corner:
Video content improves SEO, increases conversion rates and more. We believe in video as an effective lead generation tool so much that we wrote an entire blog on how to use it for that very purpose. Things like using high-quality, informative videos as gated content, adding calls to action at the end of free videos and housing videos on a landing page with a related offer can help you start generating some leads. 

Nutshell allows for 500 emails to be sent at a time. Email providers (such as Outlook or Google) apply additional restrictions to the number of emails you can send at once, as well as daily email sending limits. If you are running into email failures, try reducing the number of emails you are sending at one time from Nutshell to around 100 recipients. Read on if you are trying to send hundreds or thousands of emails at a time on a regular basis...
Next, we’ll comb through our catalog of blog posts that are on this broader topic—say something like how to nail your follow up strategy—and we’ll start organizing these posts into a single Google Doc along this cohesive theme. We’ll take inventory of any major gaps that might’ve been overlooked and begin backfilling where necessary, while at the same time removing redundant content that’s been covered already in the book.
Press releases are a marketing tool underutilized by most small businesses. A press release is typically associated with print publication, such as newspapers and trade magazines, but can be used by small businesses to communicate with customers, informing them of a particular new inventory item or promotion. Unlike a newsletter or catalog, press releases focus on one message and are designed to inform readers and entice them to visit the business online or in person.
I agree with Mor Mester as I also found the article very useful. Email continues to be the most effective marketing tool, which can be smartly utilized with the effectiveness of a marketing automation tool. I invested in Aritic PinPoint marketing automation platform, which turned out to be a turning point for my business. It allowed me to set both the behavioral and demographic segments to be set up in the same module where campaign workflow steps are set up, which is the selling point of this tool as it reduces the need to build segments in a different interface. I selected this tool ass I found a number of its features to be satisfactory for my business. Thanks a lot for sharing! Cheers!
Email marketing campaigns are widely used to drive sales; however, well-written emails can also be a powerful tool in improving brand loyalty and expanding business. Most email marketing and marketing automation platforms offer a wide array of templates and drip campaign functions that create a multitude of marketing opportunities. A brief review of short term and long term marketing objectives should point you in the direction of one or more of the following six email marketing strategies:

Choose whether emails are sent as new messages to each recipient or as replies to your last conversation with each recipient. If you have no prior conversation with a recipient, the email will be sent as a new message. If you do have a prior conversation with the recipient, the email will be sent as a reply, and the Subject of your email campaign will be ignored, since the Subject of the last conversation will be used.
Include your contact information in the newsletter. You always want your contact information in an easy-to-find area on the newsletter. The purpose of your newsletter isn’t necessarily to sell, but if your customers are inspired to reach out to you because of the newsletter, you want them to be able to find you. You could put social media contact buttons in the header or footer of your message; you could go the more traditional route, and include your phone number and email address; or you could do both. In the example below from our very own VerticalResponse newsletter, you’ll notice the social buttons in the top right corner:
While traffic brokers like Harris Fellman from Traffic For Me are upfront about acting as conduit between you and the solo ad provider, many aren’t. There’s a whole slew of one-man-show solo ad providers who don’t even have a mailing list. They sell traffic at a markup and resell it to other solo ad providers (which you may already be buying from).
Companies also need to map out the customer’s journey across their marketing funnel. It’s almost like leaving breadcrumbs for your customer—after they look at your services, where do you want them to go? Leave “breadcrumbs” like a downloadable piece of collateral or invite them to sign up for a newsletter. Once you figure out the ideal new customer journey, you can measure where users drop off and improve your site accordingly.
As popular as newsletters are, they have a drawback. When you send multiple links or blurbs in an email, you weaken your main call-to-action. Your subscriber may click on the first link or two in your email but may not come back to the others, or they may skim your email and move on. So, if your main goal is to drive a specific action – sign up for this webinar, buy this product, read my latest blog post – you may be better off with a standalone email. These emails are dedicated to just one topic and put the call to action front and center. Your readers’ attention won't be diverted, so they’re more likely to take the action you want them to.
When it comes to designing an email for a specific offer, the main component to keep in mind is the offer itself. You want the copy to be brief but descriptive enough to convey the offer's value. In addition, make sure your email's call-to-action (CTA) link is large, clear, and uses actionable language. You can also include a large CTA image/button underneath to make the action you want email readers to take crystal clear.

Email has been shown to generate a better ROI compared to other marketing channels. A survey by the Direct Marketing Association and Demand Metric of marketers in the United States showed that email achieved a median ROI of 122%, which was more than 4 times higher than other marketing channels, including social media (28%), direct mail (27%), and paid search (25%). And in 2016, email marketing generated $44 ROI for every $1 spent, which was up from $38 in 2015.
The first step is to collect a comprehensive list of email addresses. The only significant disadvantage of email marketing is that many countries have laws against sending spam. Companies that send out unsolicited emails can face significant fines. It is crucial to only send emails to customers who want to receive them. It is important to make the process easy for customers to sign up for email updates (See also Permission Marketing). They can also offer incentives like one time coupons to encourage higher subscription rates.
The two examples above are of Brain Pickings’ weekend newsletter (to the left) and Fast Company’s design daily newsletter (to the right). These emails are always packed with useful and entertaining information, a sure sign of high clickthrough rates and an engaged audience. On the top of each newsletter, you will spot a call-to-action which invites people to either donate or subscribe.
There are a few ways in which you can promote online, as I mentioned in the last sentence. You can use the social networks towards your promotion (also known as the Social Media Marketing, or SMM). You can also hire an SEO (Search Engine Optimization) consultant, who will work towards optimizing the search engines to make sure that your website comes out on top when searching certain keywords that are related to your business.
Email marketing messages can also help you increase traffic to your website. You can link to relevant website content within your email message or craft a compelling CTA that asks readers to head back to your website to take a specific action. If you really want to make your CTA stand out, you may want to use a colorful button, which makes it easy as possible for readers to take notice of your CTA and make their way back to your website.

Email marketing is an essential component of a marketing strategy for any kind of business. It does not matter if you own a brick-and-mortar shop, or you sell your products via an e-commerce website. This marketing tool will allow you to better communicate with your customers, inform them about the launch of new products, attract them with customized offers, and much more. All this is done by creating an email campaign and sending out a carefully crafted email newsletter to your potential and existing customers and clients.
Email Newsletters – These are regular emails that are sent to a list of subscribers who have chosen to receive updates from a company. Newsletters usually don't have explicit sales messages, but try instead to build a relationship between a customer and a brand. They often have a conversational tone and contain news and information that will be of interest to the customer. The goal is to keep a customer connected to a company even when they are not buying anything.
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