Your About Us page. As marketer Bob Frady writes, “Customers don’t sign up for email, they sign up for your brand.” Email is merely a mechanism—your brand and offers are the backbone of your value proposition and a subscriber’s incentive to give you their email. If your About Us page is doing its job selling your company’s vision, it’s a great place to encourage customers to subscribe.

Earlier in this guide we shared just how valuable a simple cart abandonment campaign can be. Once that’s in place, you may want to test a series of emails that goes out over two weeks. Start with gentle reminders first and, if they don’t work, move on to greater incentives, like discounts. You’ll find that many of your recovered carts return before the discounts are even required.
Companies considering the use of an email marketing program must make sure that their program does not violate spam laws such as the United States' Controlling the Assault of Non-Solicited Pornography and Marketing Act (CAN-SPAM),[10] the European Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations 2003, or their Internet service provider's acceptable use policy.
Include your contact information in the newsletter. You always want your contact information in an easy-to-find area on the newsletter. The purpose of your newsletter isn’t necessarily to sell, but if your customers are inspired to reach out to you because of the newsletter, you want them to be able to find you. You could put social media contact buttons in the header or footer of your message; you could go the more traditional route, and include your phone number and email address; or you could do both. In the example below from our very own VerticalResponse newsletter, you’ll notice the social buttons in the top right corner:
Using Twitter for lead generation starts with one thing… a targeted audience of followers. While it may seem like attracting thousands of followers is the primary goal of Twitter, that isn’t the case. When it comes to generating leads or creating business momentum, a Twitter profile with thousands of untargeted or random followers is not very valuable.

You can easily segment groups of your prospects and customers and send them specific marketing messages that target their personal needs and interests. By segmenting your email list, you can take the personalization of your emails to a whole new level. Demographic, geographic, and behavioral (e.g., past purchases) are a few of the types of data that you can use to target different segments of your email list and send more relevant and personalized email content.
One of the benefits native content has over guest blogging is that more overtly promotional content is often tolerated, which may be beneficial for generating leads in the short-term. With native advertising, your ads are front and center. They catch readers' attention by showing up in places that they're already checking out, instead of in a place that they've grown accustomed to ignoring.
Most email marketing providers include split testing or A/B testing in the platform so that you can test multiple elements including different subject lines, the inclusion of video content, different email formats, and many other aspects. Split testing is one of the best ways to optimize your email marketing and nearly half of marketers use it to test alternate subject lines. By taking advantage of the split testing capabilities of your ESP, you can increase your email open rates and engagement success.

Another one of the major benefits of email marketing is list segmentation. This allows you to segment or separate your email list into different groups with relevant characteristics or interests. Once you have done this, you can start to deliver more targeted content to your readers. This increases relevancy and value, which can encourage more conversions.
25 awesome tactics straight from the experts! Thanks for putting this together, Mark. Small businesses don’t have to be chained to adapting shady lead generation techniques as these strategies work when done right. There’s a robust CRM out there that won’t break the bank (free, even). You can integrate it with your current phone system using a 3rd party integration tool like Tenfold, as we did. Our CRM, phone system, lead gen tools, and many others work seamlessly together. It provides us access to all the relevant info in a single easy-to-use dashboard.
No matter what type of email you’re sending, the bottom line for every type is value. Every email should provide something valuable to your audience, whether that’s a perfectly timed offer, a lead-nurturing message tailored to where the user is in your funnel, or a newsletter packed with interesting, relevant content. And because user experience matters, it should be easy for users to see that value quickly through simple, easy-to-read and mobile-optimized messages.
According to research from Clutch, newsletters are the most popular type of email, with 83 percent of companies sending them. These emails are typically sent on a consistent schedule (weekday mornings tend to be the most popular with brands) and will often contain either content from the company blog or website, links curated from other sources, or both.
Unlike marketing channels such as billboard ads, flyers, or television commercials, email marketing allows you to communicate with your customers and leads in real time. This makes it the perfect channel to send timely messages to your email subscribers. For instance, if you are having a last minute sale or want to remind customers of a promotion that is ending soon, you can quickly put together a marketing email that will reach reader’s inboxes in just enough time to allow them to take advantage of the promotions that are set to expire.
Reorder Emails — If your company sells a product that needs to be reordered regularly, such as vitamins or ink cartridges, you can use a reorder email program to remind customers before they run out. Coming up with an effective reorder email strategy for your products/services could result in a significant boost in sales and revenue. In a MarketingSherpa case study, for example, an air products company generated about $2 per email sent, thanks to a three-part triggered email series that reminded customers to replace their indoor air filers. Of the customers who clicked through to company’s website, 53% made a purchase.

Since I work in the politics and advocacy, I have a lot of customers reaching out to me looking for business lead generation ideas and ways to connect with elected officials, mostly when Facebook, Twitter, and email, all prove ineffective for them. And it’s always the same reason; because all these channels are easily glanced over or ignored. But, writing a letter or calling them up and having a real conversation; that’s difficult to ignore and that’s what always works best.


Deciding which customers receive which emails is a way to give marketing messages relevance. Larger companies will use email to push multiple different products, updates and offers. Matching the message to the customer leads to higher sales and greater levels of customer satisfaction. Email marketing software makes it easy for companies to segment their email delivery based on criteria that they establish.
The two examples above are of Brain Pickings’ weekend newsletter (to the left) and Fast Company’s design daily newsletter (to the right). These emails are always packed with useful and entertaining information, a sure sign of high clickthrough rates and an engaged audience. On the top of each newsletter, you will spot a call-to-action which invites people to either donate or subscribe.
Instead, consider aiming for “green light benchmarks,” a concept created by Ramit Sethi. Once you’ve reached a certain threshold, you can give yourself the “green light” to move on to something else for a bit—there are always bigger fish to fry when growing a business. Sanocki recommends the following benchmarks for most of your promotional and lifecycle email campaigns:
Transactional emails are usually triggered based on a customer's action with a company. To be qualified as transactional or relationship messages, these communications' primary purpose must be "to facilitate, complete, or confirm a commercial transaction that the recipient has previously agreed to enter into with the sender" along with a few other narrow definitions of transactional messaging.[3] Triggered transactional messages include dropped basket messages, password reset emails, purchase or order confirmation emails, order status emails, reorder emails, and email receipts.
Email is an “owned” digital marketing channel—that is, the sender fully controls the content and distribution—and typically works best when used to send personal, relevant messages to segmented lists of recipients. Email is an especially important tool in relation to ecommerce, where it’s used for sending transactional, promotional, and lifecycle messages (which we’ll cover in more detail below).
An eBook acts as a great incentive to get people to sign-up and provide you with their contact details and other useful information that you previously would not have access to. For instance, you could ask them to describe their biggest pain point and provide their mobile phone number in addition to their name and email address. Remember, website visitors are only willing to give up so much information, so the better the value offer, the more information they will give.
Email has been shown to generate a better ROI compared to other marketing channels. A survey by the Direct Marketing Association and Demand Metric of marketers in the United States showed that email achieved a median ROI of 122%, which was more than 4 times higher than other marketing channels, including social media (28%), direct mail (27%), and paid search (25%). And in 2016, email marketing generated $44 ROI for every $1 spent, which was up from $38 in 2015. 
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