Every now and then, you may want to send a dedicated email to a certain group of people. For example, if you're hosting a conference or event, you might want to send a dedicated email just to event registrants to alert them of any new event updates they should be aware of (like in the screenshot above). Or if your business is community based, it might be a good idea to send a monthly email to welcome all your new members. 

Email is often the lifeblood for new content. If you use content marketing to educate current customers and reach new ones, consider including that content in a regular newsletter, or have new content sent out automatically over email, through RSS. When you’re able to make the investment, consider creating content that provides additional context for your new or updated products (e.g., grooming tips for beauty products).


Astonishingly, using a pop-up box is one of the easiest ways to procure emails ids. Just remember to make a box that is attractive and has an easy to locate and use the exit button—if someone does not want to engage with you. As per this study conducted by a blog, a website generated 1375% more registered email ids thanks to the installation of a pop-up box on the homepage.

When it comes to marketing your business, it’s important to be where your consumers are.  Email use is thriving and is used by 95% of online consumers.  91% of consumers reported checking their email at least once a day (Exact Target).  In fact, it’s not uncommon for consumers to check their email dozens of times each day.  Using email marketing to promote content and your products and services is a great way to drive more traffic to your website and is a highly effective tool for nurturing leads through the buying cycle.
Include your contact information in the newsletter. You always want your contact information in an easy-to-find area on the newsletter. The purpose of your newsletter isn’t necessarily to sell, but if your customers are inspired to reach out to you because of the newsletter, you want them to be able to find you. You could put social media contact buttons in the header or footer of your message; you could go the more traditional route, and include your phone number and email address; or you could do both. In the example below from our very own VerticalResponse newsletter, you’ll notice the social buttons in the top right corner:
Order Status Emails — For companies with e-commerce sites, this series of emails keeps customers informed about the status of their orders and typically includes order confirmation, shipment confirmation, shipment tracking, delivery confirmation, and receipts. Transactional emails such as these typically have average open rates that exceed 75%; however, few marketers use these opportunities to build customer relationships and grow revenue.
Whenever a prospect, lead, or customer fills out a form on one of your landing pages, a kickback email should automatically get triggered after their submission. Depending on the form, these kickback emails are often referred to as thank-you emails. These emails are mainly for the sake of fulfilling your promise to the user, and storing the information you promised them safely in their inbox.
At Campaign Monitor, we send what we call “blog solos” to highlight individual blog posts. We don’t expect readers to spend their entire day scrolling through our resources pages. Instead, we know a lot of people want to be given curated and relevant content in a way that’s extremely accessible. So we send emails that give a brief overview of a blog post, then a bold call to action that draws them into reading the rest.
“I’m in” as button text tackles the opt-in action directly. Visitors that have read your content and have agreed to continue developing their relationship with you are ‘in’. If you’re making any sort of presentation or offer, “I’m in!” allows your visitors to opt-in with passion and zeal. Like agreeing to an outing with a friend, “I’m in” states that you’re subscribing to what is offered.
Email has been shown to generate a better ROI compared to other marketing channels. A survey by the Direct Marketing Association and Demand Metric of marketers in the United States showed that email achieved a median ROI of 122%, which was more than 4 times higher than other marketing channels, including social media (28%), direct mail (27%), and paid search (25%). And in 2016, email marketing generated $44 ROI for every $1 spent, which was up from $38 in 2015.
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