Include your contact information in the newsletter. You always want your contact information in an easy-to-find area on the newsletter. The purpose of your newsletter isn’t necessarily to sell, but if your customers are inspired to reach out to you because of the newsletter, you want them to be able to find you. You could put social media contact buttons in the header or footer of your message; you could go the more traditional route, and include your phone number and email address; or you could do both. In the example below from our very own VerticalResponse newsletter, you’ll notice the social buttons in the top right corner:
If there’s one function they serve, it’s to keep your company top-of-mind for your audience, and to remind them of your brand whenever you can. Any sales and engagement on top of that is a big plus, and you should definitely optimize these campaigns to improve engagement. But make sure you’re sending something compelling to keep your readers interested.
Lead-Nurturing Emails — This type of email helps you move a lead through your sales funnel, while cutting the amount of time required by a sales team to educate prospects about your services and products. Lead-nurturing emails should be short emails with the main purpose of driving prospects to take action on your website. Click here for more information about setting up a successful automated nurturing or drip campaign.
Press releases are a marketing tool underutilized by most small businesses. A press release is typically associated with print publication, such as newspapers and trade magazines, but can be used by small businesses to communicate with customers, informing them of a particular new inventory item or promotion. Unlike a newsletter or catalog, press releases focus on one message and are designed to inform readers and entice them to visit the business online or in person.
Email has been shown to generate a better ROI compared to other marketing channels. A survey by the Direct Marketing Association and Demand Metric of marketers in the United States showed that email achieved a median ROI of 122%, which was more than 4 times higher than other marketing channels, including social media (28%), direct mail (27%), and paid search (25%). And in 2016, email marketing generated $44 ROI for every $1 spent, which was up from $38 in 2015.
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