The biggest thing I have learned from A/B testing is the effectiveness of a pricing page in the lead generation process. Many B2B companies oppose pricing pages because they want visitors to request further information, and fear they will lose opportunities. In my lead gen efforts, I can confirm that total inquiries may go down a little bit, but public pricing pages have eliminated many leads that shop only with price as a decision factor.
Also, another reason why this kind of marketing is important for any business and should not be ignored and forgotten is that it is very inexpensive. You can incorporate it into any kind of marketing plan that your business might have, without having any additional costs. This way, if you get anything from email marketing, you will, basically, get something for nothing. Creating profit, without spending any money, is something that every serious business will take into consideration.
In conclusion, email marketing definitely offers numerous benefits to small businesses. Even though social media landscapes keep evolving, small business email marketing’s importance will keep on growing. To put it short, the benefits of email marketing comes down to the fact that it is exceptionally cost-effective while working extremely efficient.
With OptinMonster, you don’t have to spend hours of your week focusing on lead capture strategies. Our unique lead generation software features an intuitive drag and drop builder, powerful A/B testing features, page level targeting, and exit intent technology – all of which work together and allow you to focus on what really matters: crafting influential emails that engage your subscribers.
As the administrator of LinkedIn Group, when you send a LinkedIn Announcement, you're directly reaching a LinkedIn user's inbox. And when you create a Google+ event, sending the invite directly sends you into users' email boxes as well. Without having to create lists or collect email addresses, you automatically have access to users' email, but be sure to tap into these resources with care.
1. Everyone on your mass emailing list must be an opt-in subscriber. Oh did we say must? Sorry, we meant MUST. If you send unsolicited email messages, that is considered to be spam. You can avoid the dreaded spam label (which will hurt your mass email deliverability and your business's online reputation) by only using opt-in subscriber lists. Check out our email list building blog post if you want to know more about how you can get customers to opt in to your mass email newsletters. Also, don't ever rent or buy mass email lists. And include an easy way for subscribers to opt out in each email you send, in case any of them do not wish to receive any more of your email messages.
5. The conference Cliffs Notes: Attending an industry conference or another big event that your audience might be interested in (but unable to attend)? Take detailed notes and create a document sharing what you’ve learned. Then, build a simple landing page to make it available for download and post a link in any industry groups or forums you’re a part of.
While leads from these types of events tend to be somewhat costly in comparison to other methods, they are a substantial source of qualified leads for countless business across the world. The reason for this is because trade shows are centered around a theme, meaning those in attendance will already have some level of interest in what you have to offer.

Less Consistentcy: With newsletters, marketers generally stick to a specific schedule. For instance, you might create a weekly newsletter that goes out on Tuesday mornings. Or your company might be sending a weekend newsletter summarizing information published throughout the week. With dedicated sends, the schedule is less clear and, potentially, less consistent. You might use dedicated emails when you have published a new offer (which might be sporadic). Even if you decide to maintain a specific schedule, your subscribers might not realize it or expect communication from you because there is no clear connection between the separate sends.
Lead-nurturing emails are typically a series of related emails that are sent over a period of several days or weeks. The idea is to move leads through your funnel and convert them into customers, all through an automated series of helpful content. Not only can these emails help to convert, they also drive engagement. According to HubSpot, lead-nurturing emails generate an 8 percent click-through rate compared to a 3 percent click-through rate for general emails. These email sequences are also great time savers for your team. You set up your series once, and if it’s successful, deliver qualified leads to your sales team without much hands-on work.

In fact, many small businesses are showing a renewed interest in email marketing as a way to reach their customers with relevant, personalized messages at the right time—without needing permission from the internet’s increasingly restrictive gatekeepers. Plus, email has seen consistently healthy growth in global users with no signs of slowing down.
The internet is swarming with tips, tricks, and suggestions about how to design beautiful emails. And while a lot of marketers seem to understand the basics -- personalize the copy, make the call-to-action pop, segment your list, etc. -- many still overlook an important component of effective email marketing: emails also need to have visual appeal.
For example, email marketing services like MailChimp and ActiveCampaign allow you to track your open rates, read rates and click-through rates. Since email is the preferred method for business communication, special attention to these rates are required for small business lead generation. In addition, these platforms have some great training for b2b lead generation best practices.
Within these roundup emails, it's a good idea to use an image paired with a headline, a brief summary or introduction, and a CTA for recipients to read more. This simple format will allow you to use visuals to attract the reader to each article while still giving you the ability to feature multiple articles -- without sending a super lengthy email.
It's Paid: Sponsorship emails are being sent to people who you haven’t earned as subscribers (they didn’t opt-in to your list). In this context, you have to pay in order to get content in front of them. Vendors offer different payment packages and here you enter the land of negotiation. Some of the most popular options are paying a flat free, paying based on a CPM (cost per thousand impressions) model or paying per new lead acquired.
Most SaaS companies only mention their product very subtly (if at all) in their content, but using this method, you will mention your free trial natively in your body content within your site’s blog posts. The idea is to subtly point out the fact that you have a free trial, your product does X, and it ties in with your blog post because X reason. This should naturally flow in your post content.

Your “whales” are those customers who make large or consistent purchases from you. These customers are worth a lot and, better yet, they rarely require discounts to come back. To engage these customers, employ targeted email campaigns that court them and keep them buying—say and showcase how much you value their business, give them an 800 number if it makes sense, or offer a special loyalty program. And don’t forget to gather feedback on what they want to buy so you can sell it to them later.
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