It’s easy to test, optimize, and continually improve your email-marketing results. Which subject lines, preheaders, calls to action, headlines, content marketing messages, and email template designs resonate most with your target audience? With the right email testing and optimization strategy, you can quickly improve elements of your email campaigns to achieve substantially better performance results and higher ROI.

Most email marketing platforms offer a basic automation system composed of triggers and accompanying emails based on customer actions. Businesses utilize these platforms to automatically send detailed thank you or confirmation emails after a product has been purchased, a service has been completed, a user filled out an important form, or new users have subscribed to their blog. Automation can also further personalization by triggering customer-specific emails for birthdays or specific purchase anniversaries.


An open rate is a percentage that tells you how many successfully delivered emails in a campaigns were opened by subscribers. A standard open rate is 20%-30%. You will notice your open rate is usually higher when you’re first starting out. Your subject line plays a big role in your open rate, too—the more compelling the subject line, the higher the open rate.

One of our most successful business lead generation ideas is blogging because it’s a great way to keep your website fresh and it builds up your visibility for Google keywords. The B2B sales cycle is often longer than the B2C one, so blogging is also great for building trust in your brand and helping to nurture leads through your sales pipeline. But don’t write blog content that only speaks to your potential customers, write it for other experts in your industry and then reach out and encourage them to share your content. A simple message to a blogger in your industry can do wonders for your SEO. For instance, “Hey, I enjoyed your recent blog post about X. It inspired me to write a similar piece about Y. I would love to get your feedback – here is the link.”


Transactional emails are usually triggered based on a customer’s action with a company. To be qualified as transactional or relationship messages, these communications' primary purpose must be "to facilitate, complete, or confirm a commercial transaction that the recipient has previously agreed to enter into with the sender", along with a few other narrow definitions of transactional messaging. Triggered transactional messages include dropped basket messages, password reset emails, purchase or order confirmation emails, order status emails, reorder emails and email receipts. The primary purpose of a transactional email is to convey information regarding the action that triggered it. But, due to its high open rates (51.3% compared to 36.6% for email newsletters), transactional emails are an opportunity to engage customers: to introduce or extend the email relationship with customers or subscribers, to anticipate and answer questions or to cross-sell or up-sell products or services.

Don’t have anything like Shark Tank to associate with your name? Any reputable source can help. It can be as a simple stating a fact along with “According to the Wall Street Journal, …” Or “Recently published in the Harvard Business Review, …” Which name you drop depends on your audience. WSJ and Harvard will mean something to some. Others might find these sources pretentious. Above all, know your audience.
Companies can build campaigns centered around events they are hosting or sponsoring to build their brand persona and engage with their customers. Highlighting philanthropy is an easy way to capture the hearts of consumers while subtly persuading them to further patronize their business. Most email marketing platforms have themes and templates for invitations, follow-ups, reminders and thank-you email. Not only can businesses maintain an organized guest list and manage ongoing communication without hassle, but they can also highlight how they are affecting their community, creating brand loyalty among their subscribers.

The biggest thing I have learned from A/B testing is the effectiveness of a pricing page in the lead generation process. Many B2B companies oppose pricing pages because they want visitors to request further information, and fear they will lose opportunities. In my lead gen efforts, I can confirm that total inquiries may go down a little bit, but public pricing pages have eliminated many leads that shop only with price as a decision factor.


“So saying the solo ad went well would be an absolute understatement! On the opt in side I only receved 35% opt in, which is okay since it was a brand new squeeze, but the great part was I got a sale which made me a total of $565!!! $67 of that is going to be monthly. $497 of that was from one of the high ticket upsells on the back end. So like I said, I would say that went very well.”
When it comes to the email your business sends, make it clear that this offer or event is the result of a partnership with company X -- especially if your co-marketing partner is particularly popular or impressive. To do this, you can adjust the company logo in your email to also include the other business' logo. Furthermore, make sure your copy mentions both businesses, and create a custom graphic or image to visualize the offer or event. 
Design: With newsletters, the layout becomes a much more complicated task than it is with dedicated email sends. You’ll have to spend some time deciding on the right placement of images and text, alignment and prioritization of information. Thankfully, there are a bunch of websites out there to help you with these efforts. MailChimp, for instance, offers a package of 36 basic, flexible templates you can use to get started.
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