Most SaaS companies only mention their product very subtly (if at all) in their content, but using this method, you will mention your free trial natively in your body content within your site’s blog posts. The idea is to subtly point out the fact that you have a free trial, your product does X, and it ties in with your blog post because X reason. This should naturally flow in your post content.
What hesitations did your client have before they purchased? What did they experience after? How did they feel about the whole experience? Each section of the before-after-experience testimonial speaks to the hesitations of a potential buyer. The buyer can relate to the feeling a past customer had before they went through the process and relate to the hesitation. They’ll be able to relate to any hesitations a similar customer may have had.
“A great opportunity is to approach local animal shelters or rescue groups and offer to sponsor an adoption event. You give them money to pay for renting a space, tables and canopy shelters, maybe hire food trucks to be there, do advertising for them and then show up and work the event.  People love their pets — most people consider them members of the family.
Less Consistentcy: With newsletters, marketers generally stick to a specific schedule. For instance, you might create a weekly newsletter that goes out on Tuesday mornings. Or your company might be sending a weekend newsletter summarizing information published throughout the week. With dedicated sends, the schedule is less clear and, potentially, less consistent. You might use dedicated emails when you have published a new offer (which might be sporadic). Even if you decide to maintain a specific schedule, your subscribers might not realize it or expect communication from you because there is no clear connection between the separate sends.
Design: With newsletters, the layout becomes a much more complicated task than it is with dedicated email sends. You’ll have to spend some time deciding on the right placement of images and text, alignment and prioritization of information. Thankfully, there are a bunch of websites out there to help you with these efforts. MailChimp, for instance, offers a package of 36 basic, flexible templates you can use to get started.

In conclusion, email marketing definitely offers numerous benefits to small businesses. Even though social media landscapes keep evolving, small business email marketing’s importance will keep on growing. To put it short, the benefits of email marketing comes down to the fact that it is exceptionally cost-effective while working extremely efficient.
Even if you don’t have a physical product at all, you can still send offer emails. Here’s an example where Zapier offers a free live training session on their software. It makes their subscribers happy because it gives them access to something they probably wouldn’t have known about if they hadn’t been on the list, but it also moves their subscribers further along their sales funnel.
These automatic emails should make the CTA big and clear. Keep in mind that the CTA should link to the direct offer -- NOT to the form. In these emails, simply thank the reader for their form submission, and give them what you promised, whether it be a link to the PDF of an ebook, instructions on how to activate their free trial, or the coupon they requested. Furthermore, don't overcomplicate the appearance of these emails. The reader isn't looking for additional information, but rather the offer or content they already know they redeemed.
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