“Good old fashioned sales letters. There’s a difference between direct mail and drip mail. Most of the time, in real estate, we call drip mail, direct mail. For instance, sending postcards twice a month to a geographic farm isn’t really direct mail (despite us calling it that) because it usually isn’t angling for a “direct response.” To the contrary, it’s more about creating top-of-mind awareness and branding. Direct mail, on the other hand, has more to do with organizing a vetted/scrubbed list of ideal recipients and then delivering a calibrated letter (or a few letters in a row) that are designed to get the recipients to take action within a relatively short time frame.
We recently explored how to vet various email platforms and reviewed key tips to remember when selecting your email marketing management system. Having the right email marketing platform is a solid foundation but crafting an email that can cut through the digital clutter and reach your audience depends on more than just your platform. Carefully choosing the goals and structure of your email campaign while considering important formatting trends are key factors in creating successful email campaigns. In part two of our series, we will explore six different types of email marketing campaigns.  Join us in two weeks for our final installment when we review a series of important formatting factors to keep in mind when launching your email initiatives.
To get more B2B leads, companies need to use better, more relevant calls to action on their website. “Learn more” doesn’t really prompt a professional to give you their information; “Let’s start your project” is more action-oriented and cuts through the clutter while getting to the point. A/B test your CTAs to determine which is more effective at converting leads on your website.

These automatic emails should make the CTA big and clear. Keep in mind that the CTA should link to the direct offer -- NOT to the form. In these emails, simply thank the reader for their form submission, and give them what you promised, whether it be a link to the PDF of an ebook, instructions on how to activate their free trial, or the coupon they requested. Furthermore, don't overcomplicate the appearance of these emails. The reader isn't looking for additional information, but rather the offer or content they already know they redeemed.

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