Oftentimes, companies are tempted to ask for way too much information in the lead generation form, either to better filter and address the leads or to know as much as possible about them before replying. However, they forget that this can hurt your conversion rates A LOT and you might be missing out good leads. Most of the time, information such as number of employees, industry, revenue, website address, etc., can be added to the lead with a quick Google or LinkedIn search. 

There is a quick window of opportunity when it comes to customers opening your emails. They see your email in their inbox, and depending on how well the “From name” and subject line resonate, they decide whether to open the email or ignore it. A good open rate means that your customers know your brand well enough to want to hear from you, no matter the time of the day.
Unlike some other marketing channels, email marketing allows you to keep in touch with your customers on a consistent basis. Be it a simple, “Thank you for subscribing,” a cheery, “Welcome on board,” or a sincere “Happy Birthday,” email is the easiest and most effective way to let your customers know you value them. Customers love it when a business treats them as an individual, not just like everyone else.
Webinars are a great way to provide hands-on training in a way that’s accessible to anyone with an internet connection. Webinars also give you an opportunity to engage prospects with your brand, products or messages for a defined period of time (most webinars usually last one hour.) Each person that joins the webinar is a potential lead, which you can pass along to your sales department.
Another key benefit of email marketing is that it’s easy to see where you’re going wrong. Most email marketing software will allow you to track open, click-through and conversion rates, making it simple to spot how a campaign can be improved. These changes can be made almost immediately too, whereas print or broadcast advertising requires quite a bit of effort to alter.
One of the benefits native content has over guest blogging is that more overtly promotional content is often tolerated, which may be beneficial for generating leads in the short-term. With native advertising, your ads are front and center. They catch readers' attention by showing up in places that they're already checking out, instead of in a place that they've grown accustomed to ignoring.
Transactional emails are the messages that get triggered by a specific action your contacts have taken and enable them to complete that action. For instance, if you are signing up for a webinar, you will fill out a form and then receive a transactional (thank-you) email, which gives you login information in order to join. If you are using a double opt-in, people will receive an email asking them to click on a link in order to confirm their registration.
Don’t have anything like Shark Tank to associate with your name? Any reputable source can help. It can be as a simple stating a fact along with “According to the Wall Street Journal, …” Or “Recently published in the Harvard Business Review, …” Which name you drop depends on your audience. WSJ and Harvard will mean something to some. Others might find these sources pretentious. Above all, know your audience.
Welcome emails are the first email your subscribers receive after they’ve confirmed their email address. Since this is their first interaction with your brand in their inbox, make it memorable and worth their while. After all, subscribers are highly likely to open and click welcome emails compared to other types of promotional emails, according to a study from Experian.
Analyzing the emails of competing businesses can be a great way for companies to plan their own. This can be done easily by just signing up for their email lists. Competitor's emails reveal what kinds of images, messages and specials they are using to appeal to their customers. Businesses can then tailor their email campaigns to match or beat the offers of their competitors.
Are you doing everything you can to get the most return on investment (ROI) out of your email campaigns? Here are 14 different types of emails that can help give you a big boost to your email ROI. Perhaps you’ll find some that you could be doing but haven’t yet tried. And if you want to quantify, in dollars, some of your potential improvements from these emails, try our ROI Goalsetter®—the most advanced email ROI calculator and planning tool. You can get it free for 90 days with the promo code “FreeROI2013.”

Email Newsletters – These are regular emails that are sent to a list of subscribers who have chosen to receive updates from a company. Newsletters usually don't have explicit sales messages, but try instead to build a relationship between a customer and a brand. They often have a conversational tone and contain news and information that will be of interest to the customer. The goal is to keep a customer connected to a company even when they are not buying anything.

The elements you include in a welcome email will depend on the specifics of what you're offering. But in general, you can use the email to showcase your brand's personality and to highlight the value that recipients can expect to receive. If you're welcoming new users to a product or service, the welcome email is a great place to explain how everything works and what users need to do in order to get started.


One of my best business lead generation ideas is to go to chamber of commerce seminars and workshops and network small business owners there. I collect their business cards, send them an email asking if they want to get together for a one-to-one, where we can learn more about each other’s businesses. Many times this leads me to get a new client without spending much money at all.
Reactivation emails are sent to subscribers who have previously interacted with brand, but haven’t continued to engage. This could include consumers who abandon their shopping cart before making a purchase, email subscribers who haven’t been opening your emails, or existing customers whose subscriptions are expiring soon. Target your offers based on each subscriber’s behavior and lifecycle stage (e.g. send more aggressive offers to subscribers with lower engagement or existing customers who are likely to churn).
Whenever a prospect, lead, or customer fills out a form on one of your landing pages, a kickback email should automatically get triggered after their submission. Depending on the form, these kickback emails are often referred to as thank-you emails. These emails are mainly for the sake of fulfilling your promise to the user, and storing the information you promised them safely in their inbox.
Once you've tested the entire roster of emails listed above, you'll see that subscribers respond to some emails more than others. Don't be surprised if they're not just looking out for discounts. After all, email marketing is really about building a long term relationship with your subscribers. That kind of relationship-building requires more planning and variety. In return, you'll get better brand recall and customer loyalty. 
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