Email marketing is directly marketing a commercial message to a group of people using email. In its broadest sense, every email sent to a potential or current customer could be considered email marketing. It usually involves using email to send ads, request business, or solicit sales or donations, and is meant to build loyalty, trust, or brand awareness. Email marketing can be done to either sold lists or a current customer database. Broadly, the term is usually used to refer to sending email messages with the purpose of enhancing the relationship of a merchant with its current or previous customers, to encourage customer loyalty and repeat business, acquiring new customers or convincing current customers to purchase something immediately, and adding advertisements to email messages sent by other companies to their customers.

Another key benefit of email marketing is that it’s easy to see where you’re going wrong. Most email marketing software will allow you to track open, click-through and conversion rates, making it simple to spot how a campaign can be improved. These changes can be made almost immediately too, whereas print or broadcast advertising requires quite a bit of effort to alter.
Historically, it has been difficult to measure the effectiveness of marketing campaigns because target markets cannot be adequately defined. Email marketing carries the benefit of allowing marketers to identify returns on investment and measure and improve efficiency.[citation needed] Email marketing allows marketers to see feedback from users in real time, and to monitor how effective their campaign is in achieving market penetration, revealing a communication channel's scope. At the same time, however, it also means that the more personal nature of certain advertising methods, such as television advertisements, cannot be captured.
Earlier in this guide we shared just how valuable a simple cart abandonment campaign can be. Once that’s in place, you may want to test a series of emails that goes out over two weeks. Start with gentle reminders first and, if they don’t work, move on to greater incentives, like discounts. You’ll find that many of your recovered carts return before the discounts are even required.
If your website has a portal for visitors to log into, make sure that when your subscribers request a password change, they receive timely, personalized, and clear instructions regarding the password reset procedure. Moreover, with the prevalence of phishing activities, adding a link or email where they can report unauthorized password requests strengthens your credibility. This email from Treehouse has clear instructions on how to perform a password reset, an alternate link, and a contact email for any issues that come up.
As we move further into digital transformation, businesses are realizing that this world no longer belongs to marketers, but to consumers—the people who choose what to click on and what to ignore, with the ability to actively avoid advertisements they don’t want to see. While this complicates the strategy marketers use to cultivate interest, there’s still great potential in consumer-focused lead generation ideas.
Most companies send both types of emails because they serve distinct functions. Mass emails are sent on a schedule of the marketer’s own making, either to every email address on your mailing list or subscriber list, or you can send email to only a targeted segment. The message itself might be an email newsletter or promotion. Transactional emails, on the other hand, are triggered by a customer action (say, a password reset or abandoned cart). Whether it’s the customer or the marketer prompting the send, the usefulness of your emailing software hinges on successful delivery.

Once you've tested the entire roster of emails listed above, you'll see that subscribers respond to some emails more than others. Don't be surprised if they're not just looking out for discounts. After all, email marketing is really about building a long term relationship with your subscribers. That kind of relationship-building requires more planning and variety. In return, you'll get better brand recall and customer loyalty. 

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