While social media platforms and PPC ads limit the amount of characters you are allowed to use in your brand messaging, email has no character limits. Now, this doesn’t mean that you should abuse this feature by sending novel-length emails to your customers and leads. However, it does mean that you can take advantage of the opportunity to present a longer and more detailed message when necessary. You should always consider the goal and purpose of your email when crafting the content, but keep in mind that you have a bit more space than other channels might allow.
Your email campaign is created. Your newsletter is designed and ready. You have even sent it to your list of subscribers. Now what? This is the moment when you are dying to know what your recipients think about it. Did they open it? How many read it through? Do they click on the links and visit your website? Have they watched the video you thoughtfully inserted? Finding the right tool for you means more than finding the best bulk email software. Pinpointe offers great insight and analytics, so you can track your email campaigns and see how they are performing.

It's Targeted: Studies show that targeted and segmented emails perform better than mass email communications. Lead nurturing enables you to tie a series of emails to a specific activity or conversion event. You can craft your follow-up email based on the action a lead has taken on your website, thus showing that you are aware of their interests in the topic and what they might need next. Based on this information, lead nurturing emails can highlight reconversion opportunities that tie back to their earlier interests.
Most email marketing platforms offer a basic automation system composed of triggers and accompanying emails based on customer actions. Businesses utilize these platforms to automatically send detailed thank you or confirmation emails after a product has been purchased, a service has been completed, a user filled out an important form, or new users have subscribed to their blog. Automation can also further personalization by triggering customer-specific emails for birthdays or specific purchase anniversaries.
A common example of permission marketing is a newsletter sent to an advertising firm's customers. Such newsletters inform customers of upcoming events or promotions, or new products.[12] In this type of advertising, a company that wants to send a newsletter to their customers may ask them at the point of purchase if they would like to receive the newsletter.
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