Lead-Nurturing Emails — This type of email helps you move a lead through your sales funnel, while cutting the amount of time required by a sales team to educate prospects about your services and products. Lead-nurturing emails should be short emails with the main purpose of driving prospects to take action on your website. Click here for more information about setting up a successful automated nurturing or drip campaign.

These are just a few examples of how a brand can use on-event email campaigns to extend the dialogue with customers and personalize their experience. When using on-event emails, it’s easy to “set and forget” them. But because these emails offer a tremendous amount of opportunity for additional sales, it’s important to review their performance among your customer base on a regular basis. If certain emails aren’t doing well, make sure to revisit them and refine their content.
The search query for “lead generation ideas” will return millions of results, and while many contain helpful pieces of information, there’s an equal amount with outdated methods that simply don’t work anymore. So, we’ve filtered through the noise and isolated the lead generation ideas for both B2B and B2C that have been proven to drive results and increase leads.
Whenever a prospect, lead, or customer fills out a form on one of your landing pages, a kickback email should automatically get triggered after their submission. Depending on the form, these kickback emails are often referred to as thank-you emails. These emails are mainly for the sake of fulfilling your promise to the user, and storing the information you promised them safely in their inbox.
One is by occasionally emailing clients about updates or changes in prices – these can be automated and don’t require too much input. The second way is much more labour intensive but can reap far greater rewards and includes educated the subscriber on the advantages of a particular product. This requires you to design personalized pitches taking into account the customer’s needs and the best way of selling to them.
5. The conference Cliffs Notes: Attending an industry conference or another big event that your audience might be interested in (but unable to attend)? Take detailed notes and create a document sharing what you’ve learned. Then, build a simple landing page to make it available for download and post a link in any industry groups or forums you’re a part of.
Since the B2B buyer’s journey is typically longer than their B2C counterparts, some organizations benefit when not going directly for the sale. Instead, use AdWords to promote assets you’ve created like whitepapers or eBooks to drive traffic to optimized landing pages where users can submit their contact information and become a lead in a low-commitment setting.
42. Breathing life into dead pages: Traffic doesn’t necessarily stop flowing to an event, giveaway, or promotion page as soon as you hit the expiration date and stop promoting it. Make sure latecomers still have a way to stay connected by updating those pages with a LeadBox™. You can use it to offer a “consolation prize” lead magnet, or simply provide the chance to get notified of future events and promotions.
After 90 days of inactivity, the outlook is not good. If someone goes three months without purchasing, the odds of them returning to purchase are not great. Though, this is definitely dependent upon your store and industry. Some stores simply have a long sales cycle. Just be aware that you will probably start experiencing diminishing returns at 90 days.
According to Campaign Monitor, birthday emails are some of the most effective emails you can send, with a 481 percent higher transaction rate than promotional emails. Other milestones you can celebrate include your subscribers’ sign-up anniversary or your company anniversary. When combined with a special promotion or offer, these emails can drive much greater clicks and conversions.
3. The “sliced bread” approach: LeadPages’ head of marketing automation, Chris Davis, coined this term after thinking about a very simple kind of marketing: grocery store samples, in which shoppers are given a taste of something (like a slice from a loaf of bread) to inspire them to buy the whole product. The first chapter of an e-book, a mini consultation, or, if you’re in software, a free limited-functionality app account could serve as your first slice of bread.
A common example of permission marketing is a newsletter sent to an advertising firm's customers. Such newsletters inform customers of upcoming events or promotions, or new products.[12] In this type of advertising, a company that wants to send a newsletter to their customers may ask them at the point of purchase if they would like to receive the newsletter.
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