For instance, when I searched for “best workflow management software”, the rich snippet goes to FinancesOnline.com, one of the leading B2B review platforms. Imagine your company on this list. There’s a high chance your product will be included in what McKinsey calls the “initial consideration set” leading to the “moment of purchase” during the consumer decision journey. You also outmaneuver competitors in high-value keyword searches. This is crucial considering that Google/CEB study found out 71% of B2B searches start with a generic keyword phrase.
One of the most successful tools in the email marketers’ toolkit is segmented email lists. This means dividing your contacts according to their age, hobbies, location or other factors so that you can send more targeted emails that relate more closely to their interests. Segmented emails have an open rate that is about 15% higher than non-segmented emails and a click-through rate that is over 100% higher. One study found that more than 50% of all revenue is generated by segmented emails. Having all of your customer information in the same place as your email program means that you can apply segmentation based on almost any feature you like. Never mind targeting your customer base by age or demographic, with an email marketing platform you can send emails according to whether or not your recipients opened your previous email or how they joined your email list. The more targeted and relevant your emails are, the higher your click-through rate and user engagement will be.
You can easily segment groups of your prospects and customers and send them specific marketing messages that target their personal needs and interests. By segmenting your email list, you can take the personalization of your emails to a whole new level. Demographic, geographic, and behavioral (e.g., past purchases) are a few of the types of data that you can use to target different segments of your email list and send more relevant and personalized email content.
“I’m in” as button text tackles the opt-in action directly. Visitors that have read your content and have agreed to continue developing their relationship with you are ‘in’. If you’re making any sort of presentation or offer, “I’m in!” allows your visitors to opt-in with passion and zeal. Like agreeing to an outing with a friend, “I’m in” states that you’re subscribing to what is offered.
Newsletter Emails — Sent on a regular basis—such as monthly, bimonthly, or quarterly—newsletter emails are a great way for organizations to reinforce their industry expertise, build loyalty and engagement with subscribers, as well as grow a list of qualified prospects and customers. We have clients who get a triple-digit ROI on the email newsletters we produce for them, meaning a very strong payback. In addition, check out this great infographic for all the ways you can calculate the return from an email newsletter for your business.
Focus on regular communication with content that’s interesting and relevant to your audience. Are you a real estate agent? You can discuss topics like DIY home projects, how to landscape on a budget or even financial tips on down payments. Make sure your contact information is easily accessible so that anyone who feels compelled to reach out can do so quickly.
Great Article! I totally agree with Ryan, Point number 17. In order to sell effectively, you’ll need to constantly generate high-quality leads that you can convert to customers: leads that your salespeople can take, contact, meet and make sales with. This can even be fully automatic but your leads still need to be high quality. I have used a tool called AeroLeads and it really help me a lot for my business growth.
Arguably, this form of marketing is quite popular as well. Users love it when prizes are on offer, and they like it, even more, when they have to win them! Termed by many as digital sweepstakes, it enriches their competitive spirit and helps you to generate the right attention. Just get them to write some slogan, taglines, participate in quizzes, post pictures, or share your content—and in turn, offer them something.
In fact, many small businesses are showing a renewed interest in email marketing as a way to reach their customers with relevant, personalized messages at the right time—without needing permission from the internet’s increasingly restrictive gatekeepers. Plus, email has seen consistently healthy growth in global users with no signs of slowing down.
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Bonus: As one related mini-lead generation tactic to add onto the process of collecting leads from free downloadable materials on your blog—try leveraging exit-intent popups that detect when a visitor is about to navigate away from your opt-in page, and they'll quickly surface the reader a reminder offer to grab your download before leaving. I've tested this and seen a meaningful lift in new subscribers that otherwise would've left the page.

Digests should be easier to consume than newsletters because they generally consist of lists and links. That helps subscribers scan the email quickly and click on the parts that they are most interested in. The goals of a digest and a newsletter will most likely overlap. Remember to place the most important call-to-action at the top and measure clickthrough rate and conversions. If your goal is to drive traffic to specific pages, monitor CTR closely and don’t forget to optimize the pages to which you are sending visitors.
Be sure that your business is using and leveraging the benefits of email marketing effectively. Email is a communication channel that allows your business to speak directly to customers, prospects, partners and suppliers. When utilized as part of an overall web-based marketing strategy it is a powerful tool that provides a wide range of benefits for businesses of all sizes.
Newsletter Emails — Sent on a regular basis—such as monthly, bimonthly, or quarterly—newsletter emails are a great way for organizations to reinforce their industry expertise, build loyalty and engagement with subscribers, as well as grow a list of qualified prospects and customers. We have clients who get a triple-digit ROI on the email newsletters we produce for them, meaning a very strong payback. In addition, check out this great infographic for all the ways you can calculate the return from an email newsletter for your business.
A Return Path study of re-engagement campaigns found that around 12-percent of those receiving re-engagement emails read them. If these numbers seem small to you compared to the other types of emails on this list, consider that re-engagement campaigns are meant to win back customers that are inactive or uninterested. Getting 12-percent of these customers engaging with your brand again is no small feat.

Your “whales” are those customers who make large or consistent purchases from you. These customers are worth a lot and, better yet, they rarely require discounts to come back. To engage these customers, employ targeted email campaigns that court them and keep them buying—say and showcase how much you value their business, give them an 800 number if it makes sense, or offer a special loyalty program. And don’t forget to gather feedback on what they want to buy so you can sell it to them later.
Rather than inundating your contacts with a slew of emails about each individual product update, consider sending a sort of roundup of new updates or products periodically. For each update you list, include a large, clear headline, a brief description, and an image that showcases the product or feature. It's also worth linking to a custom page for each feature to make it easy for recipients to learn more about it.
If you do use your own email provider, you will create your message and input the email addresses just as you do for your everyday email. This is the only way to send email for free forever, but it's also the least effective and can cause problems associated with spam email (see Resources). Take a look at the email broadcast software available as well. Email distribution software can be just as effective as a mass email program.

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Rather than inundating your contacts with a slew of emails about each individual product update, consider sending a sort of roundup of new updates or products periodically. For each update you list, include a large, clear headline, a brief description, and an image that showcases the product or feature. It's also worth linking to a custom page for each feature to make it easy for recipients to learn more about it.

According to research from Clutch, newsletters are the most popular type of email, with 83 percent of companies sending them. These emails are typically sent on a consistent schedule (weekday mornings tend to be the most popular with brands) and will often contain either content from the company blog or website, links curated from other sources, or both. A newsletter might also contain upcoming events or webinars, news from your company, or other updates. Whether you create or curate your newsletter content, it should first and foremost be relevant and valuable to your audience.


Mark Sallows is a writer for Fit Small Business specializing in sales and marketing topics. Before helping other small business owners, Mark was co-founder and CEO of a successful digital publishing start-up called Turtl. Mark has also served as a non-executive director in several early stage media, marketing, and tech businesses. Before this he was an early stage venture capital investor for a global investment business. Mark lives in New Forest, a scenic area in Southern England.
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