If your website has a portal for visitors to log into, make sure that when your subscribers request a password change, they receive timely, personalized, and clear instructions regarding the password reset procedure. Moreover, with the prevalence of phishing activities, adding a link or email where they can report unauthorized password requests strengthens your credibility. This email from Treehouse has clear instructions on how to perform a password reset, an alternate link, and a contact email for any issues that come up.
This should go without saying, but having an optimized website is among the most effective lead generation strategies you can employ. It’s important to understand your website and landing pages are the central hub where most of your sales will take place. Because website optimization is such a robust topic, we’ve picked five best practices that can help your website become a lead generating machine.
Cross-Sell Recommendation Emails — Use customers’ purchase histories to create email campaigns with information about other products you sell that they may be interested in purchasing. For example, if a customer recently bought a smartphone, you know he or she may also be in the market for such accessories as cases, covers, and screen protectors. One study showed, for instance, transactional emails that include cross-sell items have 20% higher transaction rates than those without them.
When the United States Postal Service created a nationwide postal network in the 1840s, mail became an important tool for marketing. Connecting with people through their mailboxes allowed businesses to offer customized marketing messages to specific segments of the customer base. It is likely that much of the mail you now receive contains some kind of marketing message. Catalogs, brochures, coupons and political appeals all pour through the postal service on a daily basis. (See also Direct Mail Marketing)
For example, what’s an R0 F0? Well, it’s someone who has never ordered but just joined your email list. How about an R7 F10 M1000? That’s probably a loyal buyer: 10 orders which total $1,000, the most recent being a week ago. And an R400 F10 M1000? Unfortunately, that’s a former loyal buyer, a “defecting customer,” who’s very far along in the customer lifecycle curve. She’s slipping away and hasn’t bought in more than a year.
Don’t have anything like Shark Tank to associate with your name? Any reputable source can help. It can be as a simple stating a fact along with “According to the Wall Street Journal, …” Or “Recently published in the Harvard Business Review, …” Which name you drop depends on your audience. WSJ and Harvard will mean something to some. Others might find these sources pretentious. Above all, know your audience.
38. Cornerstone content: What’s the one big thing you have to teach your audience? Turn it into an exceptionally valuable lead magnet and promote it in a prominent place across your website—maybe in the header bar or navigation menu. If writing and graphics aren’t really your thing, how about creating a browser extension? A mini app? A worksheet? An Excel spreadsheet with calculation formulas built in?
I’m not talking about a self-serving fluff piece here. Take a problem that your target audience is struggling with and provide some clear, easy-to-understand guidelines for understanding or solving it. Perhaps there is some complex new legislation or a rapidly evolving technology that folks need to understand. Make it very clear and simple and you will be a hero. (See below for ideas on distributing this wonder piece).
Cross-Sell Recommendation Emails — Use customers’ purchase histories to create email campaigns with information about other products you sell that they may be interested in purchasing. For example, if a customer recently bought a smartphone, you know he or she may also be in the market for such accessories as cases, covers, and screen protectors. One study showed, for instance, transactional emails that include cross-sell items have 20% higher transaction rates than those without them.
Running an A/B test means carving out three groups of recipients: an A group, a B group, and a C group. After sending two variations of an email to the A and B groups, you’ll use your analytics to decide which message performed better by way of generating more engagement or sales. Then, you’ll send the winning version, whether that’s A or B, to your final pool of recipients (C).
Once you've tested the entire roster of emails listed above, you'll see that subscribers respond to some emails more than others. Don't be surprised if they're not just looking out for discounts. After all, email marketing is really about building a long term relationship with your subscribers. That kind of relationship-building requires more planning and variety. In return, you'll get better brand recall and customer loyalty. 
A common example of permission marketing is a newsletter sent to an advertising firm's customers. Such newsletters inform customers of upcoming events or promotions, or new products.[12] In this type of advertising, a company that wants to send a newsletter to their customers may ask them at the point of purchase if they would like to receive the newsletter. 
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