Emails are still more powerful tool than any other platform like Facebook or Twitter. It simply works great and drive powerful returns. The only thing you need to learn is to use it effectively to achieve the desired results and enjoy the benefits of Email Marketing. Just take some time out to learn the essentials of Email Marketing and implement it in your business for the growth and success.

There is a quick window of opportunity when it comes to customers opening your emails. They see your email in their inbox, and depending on how well the “From name” and subject line resonate, they decide whether to open the email or ignore it. A good open rate means that your customers know your brand well enough to want to hear from you, no matter the time of the day.
Mark Sallows is a writer for Fit Small Business specializing in sales and marketing topics. Before helping other small business owners, Mark was co-founder and CEO of a successful digital publishing start-up called Turtl. Mark has also served as a non-executive director in several early stage media, marketing, and tech businesses. Before this he was an early stage venture capital investor for a global investment business. Mark lives in New Forest, a scenic area in Southern England.
Email marketing applies old strategies to new tools. Even though email is new, the basic content of an email ad is no different than the print advertising that has been around for a century. Finding ways to use pictures, text, and special offers to make people want to buy a product has been the mission of marketers for as long as there has been marketing. As such, getting a degree in marketing is one of the best ways to prepare potential marketers for running effective email campaigns.

According to a study done by Lithium Technologies, 65% percent of users who ask a brand a question on Twitter expect a response within 2 hours, with that percentage rising to 72% if it was a complaint. By proactively listening for those mentioning your brand on social media, you can insert yourself into conversations in real time and capitalize on a countless lead generation opportunities that you’d be missing otherwise.

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A common example of permission marketing is a newsletter sent to an advertising firm's customers. Such newsletters inform customers of upcoming events or promotions, or new products.[12] In this type of advertising, a company that wants to send a newsletter to their customers may ask them at the point of purchase if they would like to receive the newsletter.
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