These are just a few examples of how a brand can use on-event email campaigns to extend the dialogue with customers and personalize their experience. When using on-event emails, it’s easy to “set and forget” them. But because these emails offer a tremendous amount of opportunity for additional sales, it’s important to review their performance among your customer base on a regular basis. If certain emails aren’t doing well, make sure to revisit them and refine their content.
Everyone loves a compelling story, so if you can find a notable one from a staff member, customer, or even your own business and life, consider using it as a topic for a newsletter. Maybe a customer used your fitness products to lose 50 pounds, or you could share what originally inspired you to start your business. Whatever the story is about, it should be both interesting and relevant to your brand.
Newsletters are great not only for marketing to prospects, but also for nurturing your existing customers with company news and events, product announcements and feedback requests. Such ongoing communication will help you retain happy customers and collect valuable insights about them. What are the tidbits of information they click on the most? Can you upsell to them at all? Don’t forget that your existing customer base can also spread the word about your company and share resources that you publish with their network.
A common example of permission marketing is a newsletter sent to an advertising firm's customers. Such newsletters inform customers of upcoming events or promotions, or new products.[12] In this type of advertising, a company that wants to send a newsletter to their customers may ask them at the point of purchase if they would like to receive the newsletter.

Though it’s been around a while, email is by no means an outdated marketing strategy for business. Even with the rise of social media platforms and business blogging, email is still the number one way to communicate with your audience. If you are not yet taking advantage of this tried and true marketing strategy, these 15 benefits of email marketing just may be the impetus to get you started.


Conversions and increased sales - if you have a new promotion people can click on links and follow your call-to-action immediately. Email marketing is also effective at every stage of the buying process. For example, you can influence someone to choose your product, nurture the customer relationship post-transaction and also encourage future purchases.
Look into the statistics of your blog, what are the articles which are driving the biggest amount of traffic? It might be worthwhile to convert those blog post into white papers and setting up a landing page for them. Setting up a landing page takes to much time? Just offer for people to download the post in PDF format in exchange for their email address.
While this might seem surprising at first, think about your own online behavior: When you sign up for a website (like an online store), you have to enter your email address to create the account. You even need an email address to create a Facebook or Twitter account. What’s more, Facebook and Twitter email to notify users of activity, like when someone is tagged in a photo.
Not every lead will turn into your customer on first contact. One thing is for sure, they will likely buy from someone at a future date. It’s important you keep in front of them, so you can have the opportunity to reach them when they are ready to buy. Using a follow up email campaign after your initial consultation will keep your company in front of your prospect on a regular basis. This will in turn lead to some of them converting into sales when they get to a point where they are ready to buy. The fact that the email campaign is automated means that it requires little management from you.
Develop a lead generation offer that involves an analysis of an opportunity that your services are well suited to address. For example, how much money could a company save by using your solution? This serves two important functions. First, many potential clients don’t pursue services that might help them because they don’t have time to analyze the front-end B2B analytics to make the case. Second,x this gives you a chance to establish a relationship with a company that you can really provide a benefit to. If you can’t provide value, you won’t continue to chase them.
While traffic brokers like Harris Fellman from Traffic For Me are upfront about acting as conduit between you and the solo ad provider, many aren’t. There’s a whole slew of one-man-show solo ad providers who don’t even have a mailing list. They sell traffic at a markup and resell it to other solo ad providers (which you may already be buying from).
A common example of permission marketing is a newsletter sent to an advertising firm's customers. Such newsletters inform customers of upcoming events or promotions, or new products.[12] In this type of advertising, a company that wants to send a newsletter to their customers may ask them at the point of purchase if they would like to receive the newsletter.
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