In order to maximize your opt-in rates, we recommend that you offer visitors a relevant free gift such as a report or an e-book as a way to say thank you for their sign ups. For example, if your product is in the weight loss niche and would like to target the weight loss crowd, give them a free weight loss report or an e-book in exchange for their opt-in. After they had opt-in into your own list, you can always do a follow up with them again and sell them your product line or introduce your service. You will find getting a sale easily with a great products or services which will benefit them.
One of the greatest advantages of email marketing is that it allows marketers to send targeted messages. Print, radio and television ads are broadcast indiscriminately and frequently reach consumers who have no interest in the product offered. But email marketing allows companies to tailor certain ads to certain customers. If a customer has shopped for a brand of shoes in the past, companies can email them coupons for that same brand knowing that they have already expressed an interest.
If you’re not able or willing to commit to a newsletter, another email solution is to find relevant and quality newsletters published by others and pay to have your advertisements included in them. Such newsletters are often high-quality, upscale publications that have established and growing readerships in specific age groups and income groups. They also target groups based on variables such as gender, education level or geographical location.
To get even more engagement from your post, don’t include a link within the actual update. Right now, LinkedIn is favoring content in the feed that’s free of links (indicating promotion of something), so mention in the last line of your update that the link to your post where people can read more will be in the first comment—and just paste it in there after posting the update.
According to Clutch, even though 90 percent of marketers say it's important to optimize emails for mobile devices, just 59 percent of companies say optimization is part of their email marketing efforts. Yet in 2016, more than 50 percent of email opens took place on a mobile device, and that number is only going to grow with time. Moreover, if an email is difficult to read or just doesn’t look good on their device, 71 percent of people will delete it, and 16 percent will hit unsubscribe. While it’s great to see marketers focusing on personalization and segmentation (both extremely important tactics in an email strategy), it’s surprising that more aren’t looking at mobile. It doesn’t matter how great the content in your email is, if it’s not mobile optimized, most people won’t even bother to read it, and some will opt out altogether – not the results you’re looking to get from your email strategy.
Instead, consider aiming for “green light benchmarks,” a concept created by Ramit Sethi. Once you’ve reached a certain threshold, you can give yourself the “green light” to move on to something else for a bit—there are always bigger fish to fry when growing a business. Sanocki recommends the following benchmarks for most of your promotional and lifecycle email campaigns:

Email marketing is an important marketing tool for any small business. Let’s get that on the table up front. Although it may not be as glamorous as social media marketing platforms like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or Instagram, it has proven to be more effective for delivering conversions and higher ROI. When small businesses are looking for a cost effective, shareable, measurable form of marketing, the benefits of email marketing place it right at the top of the list.
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