If you only ever send fancy formatted emails, text-only messages may be worth a try. According to HubSpot, even though people say that they prefer heavily-designed emails with numerous images, in actuality, simpler emails with less HTML won out in every A/B test. In fact, HTML emails tend to have lower open and click-through rates that correlate directly to how many HTML elements are included. This is likely due to email programs such as Gmail filtering promotional emails out of the main inbox and into a different tab where they may not be seen by users. Plainer emails can be great for event invitations, blog content, and survey or feedback requests. But even if you don’t send text-only messages, simplifying your emails and including fewer images could be enough to boost your open and click through rates.
There is a quick window of opportunity when it comes to customers opening your emails. They see your email in their inbox, and depending on how well the “From name” and subject line resonate, they decide whether to open the email or ignore it. A good open rate means that your customers know your brand well enough to want to hear from you, no matter the time of the day.
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“Good old fashioned sales letters. There’s a difference between direct mail and drip mail. Most of the time, in real estate, we call drip mail, direct mail. For instance, sending postcards twice a month to a geographic farm isn’t really direct mail (despite us calling it that) because it usually isn’t angling for a “direct response.” To the contrary, it’s more about creating top-of-mind awareness and branding. Direct mail, on the other hand, has more to do with organizing a vetted/scrubbed list of ideal recipients and then delivering a calibrated letter (or a few letters in a row) that are designed to get the recipients to take action within a relatively short time frame.

While this might seem surprising at first, think about your own online behavior: When you sign up for a website (like an online store), you have to enter your email address to create the account. You even need an email address to create a Facebook or Twitter account. What’s more, Facebook and Twitter email to notify users of activity, like when someone is tagged in a photo.
In fact, many small businesses are showing a renewed interest in email marketing as a way to reach their customers with relevant, personalized messages at the right time—without needing permission from the internet’s increasingly restrictive gatekeepers. Plus, email has seen consistently healthy growth in global users with no signs of slowing down.
According to research from Clutch, newsletters are the most popular type of email, with 83 percent of companies sending them. These emails are typically sent on a consistent schedule (weekday mornings tend to be the most popular with brands) and will often contain either content from the company blog or website, links curated from other sources, or both.
Repeated surveys have proven that transactional emails are more effective at engaging subscribers and result in greater ROI than bulk emails. In fact, Experian reports that the average revenue per transactional email is two to five times greater than standard bulk emails and that they have almost eight times the open and click rates. Yet, out of all marketers, only 40% are using transactional emails.

In the old world of information scarcity, the concept of “lead generation” meant marketing found the names of potential buyers and passed them to sales. Buyers expected that they would have to talk to sales and sales expected to speak to uneducated early stage buyers that may not yet be qualified. This has all changed. Today, buyers can do their own research online and can find a variety of educational resources through search engines, social media, and other online channels. Through content resources, today’s buyer can learn a great deal about a product or service before ever having to even speak to a sales person.  So businesses must make sure that they build their digital presence.
DISCLAIMER: We CANNOT determine or predict the results you will receive with your solo ad. It is your responsibility to have a high converting offer and sales funnel. We can guarantee that you’ll get at least the number of UNIQUE clicks that you paid for, delivered to the URL you’ve provided. There are NO REFUNDS after traffic has started and/or been delivered to you.
Like with all groups on your social channels, work hard to avoid being overly self-promotional about your offering by sharing tons of links or talking about your product. Allow genuine interest & appreciation to be the driving factor in starting one-on-one conversations with group members, and those will more naturally lead to authentic relationships that could blossom into new-found customers.
eROI’s monthly newsletter is a stellar example on so many levels. The first few paragraphs includes an entertaining introduction to the topic of the newsletter. Then, they include four “insider tips”, which include “read more” buttons to the blog post on their site. But the best part of this newsletter is the interactive element at the bottom: they used working radio buttons to allow subscribers to vote for next month’s theme! How cool is that?
“Good old fashioned sales letters. There’s a difference between direct mail and drip mail. Most of the time, in real estate, we call drip mail, direct mail. For instance, sending postcards twice a month to a geographic farm isn’t really direct mail (despite us calling it that) because it usually isn’t angling for a “direct response.” To the contrary, it’s more about creating top-of-mind awareness and branding. Direct mail, on the other hand, has more to do with organizing a vetted/scrubbed list of ideal recipients and then delivering a calibrated letter (or a few letters in a row) that are designed to get the recipients to take action within a relatively short time frame.
More and more people are checking their email from their mobile devices. What does this mean for your business? You can use email marketing to reach people no matter where they are or what type of device they are on, improving visibility and reach over time. Make sure that your emails are easy to open and read from mobile devices, paying close attention to image sizes and the amount of text on the page.
When it comes to marketing your business, it’s important to be where your consumers are.  Email use is thriving and is used by 95% of online consumers.  91% of consumers reported checking their email at least once a day (Exact Target).  In fact, it’s not uncommon for consumers to check their email dozens of times each day.  Using email marketing to promote content and your products and services is a great way to drive more traffic to your website and is a highly effective tool for nurturing leads through the buying cycle.
Undelivered emails - poorly designed emails may not get delivered. Emails that use certain spam keywords in the subject heading or content of the email are likely to be filtered out by email software and internet service providers. If you don’t keep your marketing lists up to date, you will find incorrect email addresses mean your messages won’t reach the right person.
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